“German” Beirocks

A few weeks ago, I stopped at a Farmer’s Market bakery stand advertising their delicious “Beirocks.”  Intrigued by a bread pastry I had never heard before, I bought one. Delicious is right!

Beirocks are a sort of stuffed hand-pie filled with meat, cheese, and sauerkraut. Local legend goes that German Mennonite immigrants brought the tradition of these tasty treats to Kansas from their homeland, although I have yet to  find information on this recipe that originate anywhere but Kansas.

But who cares where they’re from? They’re awesome! They are delicious, filling, and packed with two forms of fermented foods when the bread is made with natural yeast (the other comes from the sauerkraut). We’re talking about a real win-win situation here. Another perk is that they are easily portable (great tailgate/sideline food) for this season-of-neverending-sports.

Ready? Let’s get baking!

naturally yeasted beirocks

For the Dough

We will be using the Naturally Yeasted Brioche Dough from a few posts back, mixed, risen, and ready for shaping.

For the Filling

Ingredients:

1/3 cup chopped onion (for cooking with meat)

1 lb. ground beef/turkey or shredded meat

1 cup sauerkraut (or more)

1-2 cups shredded cheese (I used mozarella, but a sharp cheese would taste very good)

1/2 cup shredded carrots (optional)

 

Instructions

When Brioche Dough has risen for 6- 8 hours, begin preparing fillings.

Brown onions in a pan, then add ground meat (and any seasonings you would like) and cook until done. Grate cheese and carrot,  get out sauerkraut.

Pull dough out of bowl onto a greased or lightly-floured surface.

Roll dough out to 1/4 inch thickness.

Cut dough into 4-inch squares (this will make a palm-sized hand-pie, you can cut them bigger or smaller to suit your needs).

natural yeast beirocks roll dough naturally yeasted beirocks cut squares Spoon a small amount of each filling into the center of each square. Your total amount of filling should be no larger than 1/8 cup if using 4-inch squares.

Now here comes the fun. Grab two opposite corners of dough, and bring them to the center, with one overlapping the other. Repeat with the remaining two corners. Gently pinch the open spaces closed. Your dough will look like an over-stuffed, sealed envelope at this point.

PicMonkey Collage naturally yeasted beirocks seal edges

Flip the pastry over and place on a greased or parchment-lined baking sheet. Repeat with remaining squares.

Tip: take dough remnants and clump together, then re-roll and cut

naturally yeasted beirocks shaped Prepare egg wash: Lightly beat one egg and 1 tablespoon of water in a small dish.

Turn oven on to 350 degrees F. Brush pastries with egg wash.

When oven is preheated, brush pastries one more time and place in oven.

naturally yeasted beirocks egg wash

Bake Beirocks for 20 minutes, or until beautifully brown on top.

Eat hot!

Naturally Yeasted beirocks done

 

naturally yeasted beirocks bite

"German" Beirocks
 
Author: 
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Fantastic crowd-pleasing hand-pies that are hearty and healthy!
Ingredients
  • Naturally Yeasted Brioche Dough
  • ⅓ cup chopped onion (for cooking with meat)
  • 1 lb. ground beef/turkey or shredded meat
  • 1 cup sauerkraut (or more)
  • 1-2 cups shredded cheese
  • ½ cup shredded carrots (optional)
Instructions
  1. Brown onions in a pan, then add ground meat (and any seasonings you would like) and cook until done. Grate cheese and carrot, get out sauerkraut.
  2. Pull dough out of bowl onto a greased or lightly-floured surface.
  3. Roll dough out to ¼ inch thickness.
  4. Cut dough into 4-inch squares
  5. Spoon a small amount of each filling into the center of each square equaling no more than ⅛ cup.
  6. Grab two opposite corners of dough, and bring them to the center, with one overlapping the other. Repeat with the remaining two corners.
  7. Gently pinch the open spaces closed. Your dough will look like an over-stuffed, sealed envelope.
  8. Flip the pastry over and place on a greased or parchment-lined baking sheet. Repeat with remaining squares.
  9. Tip: take dough remnants and clump together, then re-roll and cut
  10. Prepare egg wash: Lightly beat one egg and 1 tablespoon of water in a small dish.
  11. Turn oven on to 350 degrees F. Brush pastries with egg wash.
  12. When oven is preheated, brush pastries one more time and place in oven.
  13. Bake Beirocks for 20 minutes, or until beautifully brown on top.
  14. Makes approx. 20 small beirocks, which will easily feed 5-6 people.

 

Comments

  1. Marianne says

    Hello. I recently got your book and am excited to learn to make yummy natural yeast bread. I have tried a couple of times, but my bread hasn’t turned out so well. My start is from the bakery my husband works at, and the bread I have made with it is very sour. I was hoping to make bread that still had a traditional wheat bread taste without being overly sour. Is that possible or is it always going to have a sour taste? I am obviously very new to this. Also, my bread didn’t rise very well. It only got to about the same level as my bread pan. This may be because I had a hard time telling if my dough passed with the window pane test. The first time I kneaded it I did it by hand, the second time I used my Bosch. I live in a humid place (San Antonio), does that affect my dough? One more thing, the biggest reason I am trying all this is because my daughter has Celiac disease, and I have heard that many people with this or gluten intolerance have been able to eat natural yeast breads without problems. I haven’t found that there are significant scientific studies done (I wish someone would undertake that challenge because if this bread is okay for her that is HUGE!). She has had the waffles and did not get a stomach ache afterward, so that’s encouraging. I look forward to learning more from you. And your cook book is beautiful, by the way.

    • thebreadgeek says

      Thank you for your comment! No your bread will not always be sour. In the beginning it sometimes can seem like it always is because you are getting used to your starter and learning how it works so there is a little learning curve. Check out the 3 keys to success post (just search it here on the site) and that will help you treat your starter properly to get it mild tasting and performing well. The research around Celiac Disease you are referring to is very new and fresh, and the researchers themselves are very hesitant to draw any firm conclusions about whether or not natural yeast is acceptable for some people with Celiac Disease. I know this is difficult, but it seems like there is still so much we don’t know about the disorder itself, and all the research is very new. I hesitate to give people advice on that for liability reasons. I say to consult with a trusted health professional, and follow your instinct. 🙂

  2. Valerie says

    I’m so excited about this recipe. It’s baking in the oven at the moment. I’m wondering, did you mean 350 Degrees Farenheit? The recipe says celcius, but the Brioche recipe says 375F. I usually have to bake any of your recipes significantly longer than the recipe states anyway, so I just tried baking them at 375F. Thanks!

    • thebreadgeek says

      Yes! I had already fixed it once but I guess it didn’t update right! Thank you so much for letting me know!

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